EAST BRONX HISTORY FORUM
HUNTINGTON FREE LIBRARY & READING ROOM
9 WESTCHESTER SQ BRONX, NEW YORK
 

Your Subtitle text
THE HUNTINGTON FREE LIBRARY and READING ROOM

SAT. NOVEMBER 18th 2PM   $10 advanced sale 
BRONX  OPERA  COMPANY

Click to Buy Tickets 

SAT. NOVEMBER 18th 2pm
           
$15 at the door

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SAT NOVEMBER 18th 7:30pm 
"IT'S STILL ALL ABOUT THE WOMEN"

SAT NOVEMBER 18th 7:30pm 
"IT'S STILL ALL ABOUT THE WOMEN"

    Tickets $15  - Senior/Students $10


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Every Other SATURDAY OF THE MONTH
at the Huntington Free Library
Bronx Council on the Arts
These workshops are free and open to the public.
 Admission to all workshops is free, but space is limited.
 Please click here to visit their web page for details

Saturday, November 25

12:00-2:00pm

 

Creating and Crafting with Marbled Paper with Denise Shelley

Huntington Free Library

Fun, fun, fun… magical and slightly messy! It’s hard to believe that you’ll create such beautiful marbled designs using shaving cream and household products—but you will.  Then you’ll enhance your creation with glitter, markers, stamps, etc., to make cards, bookmarks or prints for framing. This will be a family friendly workshop!

 

Saturday, December 16

12:00-2:00pm

 

Holiday Gifts Making Workshop with Gail Sharbaan

Huntington Free Library

Artist Gail Sharbaan is pulling out the glitter and glue and inviting you to add fun to holiday gift making. Please bring your imagination, enthusiasm and a friend to this fun-filled event. Gail teaches crafting and creative writing to youths and adults at various community-based programs in the Bronx. Her artwork has been featured in exhibitions throughout the world. Through her work, Gail inspires artists of all ages and abilities to explore various materials and processes of creativity. She’s the author of a collection of short stories entitled Tales from the Streets and has also contributed to various anthologies and publications.

 

 

The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is located at 
9 Westchester Square ( AKA 9 Lane Avenue )
Bronx, New York. 


***********************************************

 

 

The Huntington Free Library and Readat 
9 Westchester Square ( AKA 9 Lane Ave)
Bronx, New York. 

*******************************************************************************************************************
 Bronx Council on the Arts

Every Other SATURDAY OF THE MONTH
at the Huntington Free Library

These workshops are free and open to the public.
 Admission to all workshops is free, but space is limited.

Please click here to visit their web page for details


*****************************
SPECIAL ARTS WORKSHOP
Hosted by 
BRONXMaMa.com    

 
View the HFL on HBO

BOARDWALK EMPIRE LINK

The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is located at 
9 Westchester Square ( AKA 9 Lane Avenue )
Bronx, New York. 
Admission to the programs are free.

Seating is limited. 
Call 718-829- 7770 for directions to the library


The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is a tax exempt 501(c)( 3) charitable organization 
Leave a Legacy
         

            Please remember the library in your will or trust.



Trustees and Officers

Edward A. Morgan, President Emeritus
Paul Esson - Treasurer Emeritus 

Thomas X. Casey President
Carl Anderson, Vice President
Jeff P. Jones, Treasurer
Michael Cronin, Secretary

Trustees - Edward A. Morgan
                  Sydney L. Stern
                  Richard Vitacco 
                  Nilka Martell
                  Mike Gupta
                 Angel Hernandez
 

 

                                                 Visit the Library 

The library’s collection is open by appointment  ONLY
Appointments can be scheduled for Monday through Friday from 10:00 to 4:00.scheduled. To make an appointment, call 718-829-7770.
or
email    info@huntingtonfreelibrary.org


There is no charge for use of the library’s collections.

Library hours


The Library is open to the public by appointment Monday through Friday from 10:00 to 4:00. It is also open by appointment on Saturday mornings when afternoon public programs are scheduled. 


By public transportation

(The Library is about a 45 minute ride from Grand Central Station. It is located at 9 Westchester Square in the Bronx.)

1. Get yourself to the East Side Lexington Avenue Line. 
2. You can take the IRT 4 or 5 (Express) as far as 125th Street
3. At 125th Street you must change to the #6. Take the one that says “Pelham 
Bay” on the side. 
4. Go to Westchester Square (the name of the stop). 
5. The Library is right across the street next to the Apple Bank
6. Green wrought iron fence surrounds the building. 
7. Go to the door next to the bank, and ring the doorbell. 

Note: The Library is next to the Apple Bank. Should you need directions, ask for the bank (otherwise you may be sent elsewhere). We accept a piece of identification from all patrons using our collection, and hold on to it during visits. We also store any large bags patrons bring into the Library while they are here.


Directions to Library by Car


The library is located at 9 Westchester Square in the Bronx.


From New Jersey
1. From George Washington Bridge take Cross Bronx Expressway. 
2. Follow Cross Bronx Expressway for about 4 miles going East. 
3. Get off at Castle Hill Avenue (Exit 5B).Turn left on Castle Hill, go to elevated 
railroad (Westchester Ave.), and turn right. 
4. Go past old church and cemetery on right; next left you can take is
Overing 
Street. Turn left on Overing and park car.
5. Overing runs along the side of the Library. Walk around the corner to the 
front and ring bell on door.

From East Side New York:
1. Triborough or Third Avenue Bridge to Bruckner Expressway. Take the 
Expressway to Zerega Avenue.
2. Make left onto Zerega 
3. Continue to elevated railroad (Westchester Avenue) and turn right. 
4. Go past old church and cemetery on right; next left you can take is
Overing 
Street. Turn left on Overing and park car.
5. Overing runs along the side
of the Library. Walk around the corner to the 
front and ring bell on door.


From West Side New York: 
1. Same as New Jersey but leave out Bridge; can pick up Cross Bronx 
Expressway on West Side Highway near George Washington Bridge

From Queens and Brooklyn
1. Cross over Whitestone Bridge. 
2. Proceed North, stay in middle lane, following signs for
Hutchinson River 
Parkway. 
3. Go to exit that reads “Westchester Avenue & East Tremont Ave.”
4. Take exit and proceed to traffic light. 
5. Turn left at light and go toward elevated railroad (Westchester Ave.—about 3 
blocks) 

. Right before you get to elevated railroad there is a green highway sign that 
says “Westchester Avenue Turns” and takes you to the right. Do that. Turn 
left at elevated railroad.
7. Stay under the elevated railroad thru the stop lights. Immediately past the 
elevated railroad station, on the far right is Library, next to Apple Bank. You 
may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
8. Ring bell on door

From Upstate: - On Hutchinson River Parkway 
1. Take Hutchinson River Parkway South to “Westchester Avenue East Tremont 
Avenue Exit” 
2. Make left at traffic light. 
3. Go to elevated railroad (Westchester Ave.); turn right. 
4. Go about three blocks following the elevated railroad past intersection with 
East Tremont Avenue. 
5. Immediately after entrance to elevated railroad station on the right, look for 
the Library on extreme right (next to Apple Bank).
6. You may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
7. Ring bell on door .

On New England Thruway
1. Get off thruway at Westchester Avenue Exit.
2. Follow Westchester Avenue (elevated railroad) to 1 block past East Tremont 
Avenue.
3. Immediately after entrance to elevated railroad station on the right, look for 
the Library on extreme right (next to Apple Bank).
4. You may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
5. Ring bell on door 
 

  

About the Library

 

     The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is a privately-endowed library open to the public. It has two separate non-circulating book collections: a general Reading Room collection and a research collection specialization on Bronx history.
 
The library is an exempt operating foundation, governed by a board of trustees.

 

 

History

The library was officially founded in 1892 by Collis P. Huntington, a Southern Pacific Railroad magnate whose summer home was in nearby Throgs Neck. Its origins, however, were in the will of Peter C. Van Schaick, a local philanthropist, who set aside funds from his estate to build a free reading room to be donated to the citizens of the village of Westchester upon its completion. The library, constructed between 1882 and 1883, was ultimately refused by the local townspeople who did not want to pay for its upkeep. The building sat vacant until Huntington was somehow informed of the stalemate and decided to take over the project. He put on an addition, and the library’s doors opened to the public in 1893. It was the only library for the public in the Westchester Square area of the Bronx until 1937 when the New York Public Library opened a branch across the street.

The library took on an important new role in 1930, when Archer M. Huntington, Collis’s adopted son and benefactor of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, built an addition to the Huntington Free Library to house the museum’s book collection which was transferred to the library.

 

 

Buildings

 

                                                                                                                   
The 1882-83 red brick reading room was designed by Frederick C. Withers, an architect known for his use of High Victorian Gothic and Gothic Revival styles. The Jefferson Market Courthouse in Greenwich Village and Gallaudet College in Washington, DC, are other examples of his work. When Collis Huntington took over the library in 1890, a local architect, William Anderson, added the rear part of the reading room and the two-story residence above it. The 1882-83 building, with its 1890 addition, was designated a New York City landmark in 1994.

When the library acquired its American Indian collection in 1930, Archer Huntington financed a new building, designed by Charles E. Birge, to hold the collection’s book stacks and staff offices. This three-story, 40’ x 82’ building is attached to the original building. It does not have public areas.

Inside the Reading Room. Visitors entering the Reading Room are greeted by a large raised engraving (1911) by B.L. Pratt of Collis Potter Huntington, dedicating the building to his memory. An oil painting of Huntington presented to the library by the citizens of West Chester in 1893 is over the fireplace. Covering the fireplace is a large-scale map, Throgg’s Neck in the 1850s, drawn by Bronx historian John McNamara. The original Visitors Register has its own stand and is in use today. The first signatures date to 1891. Booker T. Washington registered as a visitor in 1892 and 1894. The furniture in the library is in keeping with its turn-of-the-century character. Much of it is original. The piping for the reading room’s original gas lighting is most obvious in the small book stack room in the rear. A wood sculpture of the library, carved by Patrolman John H. Jones in 1901, sits on top of a bookshelf. The large map case and the library’s card catalog are still in use. Other items of interest include vintage typewriters, one a very early electric model, and a 1917 Tiffany grandfather’s clock.





Contact the Library

Huntington Free Library and Reading Room
9 Westchester Square
Bronx, NY 10461-3583

(718) 829-7770 • Fax (718) 829-4875

Support the Library

The library encourages contributions for its programs and for general support. It is currently soliciting funding to restore the windows, hanging pendant, and front doors in its 1882 New York City Landmark building. Please make checks payable to the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room. All donations are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. Your support will be greatly appreciated.

Collections

The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room has two separate non-circulating book collections: a general Reading Room collection and  a specialization in Bronx history.

Reading Room

Established in 1892, the Huntington Free Library is one of the oldest libraries for the public in the Bronx. Until 1937 when the New York Public Library established a branch nearby, it was the only library in the Westchester Square area, and maintained a collection suitable to a general reading room. Since that time, acquisitions have also complemented the needs of the Huntington Free Library's Indian collection.

General Collection

The Reading Room collection, comprising approximately 7100 volumes, is housed in open stacks in the Reading Room. The collection is catalogued in the Dewey decimal system and is accessible through a card catalog. The library staff has judiciously added to and weeded the collection over the years. Nonetheless, its character is one of the turn-of-the-century, with many of its imprints dating to the period between 1860 and 1930. Fiction, biographies, bibliographies, American history books, books on philosophy and art, American Indian juvenile books, and volumes on the natural sciences and library science comprise many of the subject areas covered. The Reading Room's general reference collection also includes modern dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, directories, almanacs, etc. 

In recent years library staff members have concentrated on acquiring general reference, American Indian juvenile literature, Western American art, and New York State history titles with the limited funds available, feeling these materials are appropriate in the environment of a non-circulating collection.
 

  Bronx History

The Reading Room's collection of materials relating to New York State history, with an emphasis on that of the Bronx, is the most heavily consulted segment of its holdings. Titles range from privately printed accounts such as Bronx Cheer: A Memoir, by Julius Jacobs (1976), The History of the Morris Park Racecourse and the Morris Family, by Nicholas Di Brino (1977), and Westchester's Forgotten Railway, by Roger Arcara (1972), to standard works like The Bronx and Its People: A History (1927), The Story of the Bronx, by Stephen Jenkins (1912), and The Borough of the Bronx, 1639-1913, by Harry Cook (1913). The breadth of New York history is reflected in the collection, beginning with works on its archaeology such as Alanson Skinner's Exploration of Aboriginal Sites at Throgs Neck and Clasons Point, New York City (1919), and William Ritchie's The Pre-Iroquoian Occupations of New York State. Historical figures are not forgotten. Three titles, for example, deal with the controversy surrounding an infamous Bronx resident, Anne Hutchinson, while several others discuss the Pell family. A collection of newspaper articles, authored primarily by John McNamara, spans a forty-year period and reflects the on-going record of Bronx history. Arranged chronologically, the collection is indexed geographically, providing easy access to articles discussing a particular Bronx neighborhood.

This special Reading Room collection is not limited to the Bronx. Several of its titles are guidebooks, gazetteers, and manuals covering all of New York City and/or including the State of New York as a whole. D.T. Valentine's Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York for 1856, for example, is complemented by subsequent editions patterned after that classic work. J. H. French's Gazetteer of the State of New York (1860) expands coverage such as Valentine's to include the entire state. New York's history is also accessible through heavily used works such as the Historical Atlas of New York State. The collection also holds a modern atlas of New York. New York City guidebooks abound in this collection. Readers can get a real sense of what the city was like in 1892 by consulting Moses King's King's Handbook of New York City. On a more practical level, recently published guidebooks such as New York Open to the Public lead readers to today's information. Both are complimented by works such as the Federal Writers' Project publications.

Bronx Photographs

The library has a growing collection of historic photographs of the Bronx, particularly of the Westchester Square area. Ships and coal barges in Westchester Creek, the 1922 World War I Honor Roll in the Square, and transportation ranging from horse-drawn hearses to the construction of the elevated railroad are featured in this collection, as is the birthplace of Ezra Cornell, the founder of Cornell University. The Westchester Square area was the scene of a great deal of activity during the Revolutionary War. Sites associated with many well-known Bronx names from the colonial era, such as Pell, Ferris, and Ponton, appear in the library’s photograph collection. The library has put much of this collection on slides. It regularly hosts programs featuring its photographs.


 

 

 

 

 

 

The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is located at 
9 Westchester Square, 
Bronx, New York. 
Admission to the programs are free. Seating is limited. 
Call 718-829- 7770

 

Trustees and Officers

 Edward A. Morgan, President Emeritus
Paul Esson - Treasurer Emeritus 

Thomas X. Casey President
Carl Anderson, Vice President
Jeff P. Jones, Treasurer
 Michael Cronin, Secretary

Trustees - Edward A. Morgan, 
              Sydney L. Stern, 
         Nilka Martel  
               Richard Vitacco  
          Michael Gupta
             Angel Hernadez

 

Visit the Library 

The library’s The Reading Room collection is open to the public by appointment Monday through Friday from 10:00 to 4:00. It is also open by appointment on Saturday mornings when afternoon public programs are scheduled. To make an appointment, call 718-829-7770.


There is no charge for use of the library’s collections.

Library hours


The Library is open to the public by appointment Monday through Friday from 10:00 to 4:00. It is also open by appointment on Saturday mornings when afternoon public programs are scheduled. 


By public transportation

(The Library is about a 45 minute ride from Grand Central Station. It is located at 9 Westchester Square in the Bronx.)

1. Get yourself to the East Side Lexington Avenue Line. 
2. You can take the IRT 4 or 5 (Express) as far as 125th Street
3. At 125th Street you must change to the #6. Take the one that says “Pelham 
Bay” on the side. 
4. Go to Westchester Square (the name of the stop). 
5. The Library is right across the street next to the Apple Bank
6. Green wrought iron fence surrounds the building. 
7. Go to the door next to the bank, and ring the doorbell. 

Note: The Library is next to the Apple Bank. Should you need directions, ask for the bank (otherwise you may be sent elsewhere). We accept a piece of identification from all patrons using our collection, and hold on to it during visits. We also store any large bags patrons bring into the Library while they are here.


Directions to Library by Car


The library is located at 9 Westchester Square in the Bronx.


From New Jersey
1. From George Washington Bridge take Cross Bronx Expressway. 
2. Follow Cross Bronx Expressway for about 4 miles going East. 
3. Get off at Castle Hill Avenue (Exit 5B).Turn left on Castle Hill, go to elevated 
railroad (Westchester Ave.), and turn right. 
4. Go past old church and cemetery on right; next left you can take is
Overing 
Street. Turn left on Overing and park car.
5. Overing runs along the side of the Library. Walk around the corner to the 
front and ring bell on door.

From East Side New York:
1. Triborough or Third Avenue Bridge to Bruckner Expressway. Take the 
Expressway to Zerega Avenue.
2. Make left onto Zerega 
3. Continue to elevated railroad (Westchester Avenue) and turn right. 
4. Go past old church and cemetery on right; next left you can take is
Overing 
Street. Turn left on Overing and park car.
5. Overing runs along the side
of the Library. Walk around the corner to the 
front and ring bell on door.


From West Side New York: 
1. Same as New Jersey but leave out Bridge; can pick up Cross Bronx 
Expressway on West Side Highway near George Washington Bridge

From Queens and Brooklyn
1. Cross over Whitestone Bridge. 
2. Proceed North, stay in middle lane, following signs for
Hutchinson River 
Parkway. 
3. Go to exit that reads “Westchester Avenue & East Tremont Ave.”
4. Take exit and proceed to traffic light. 
5. Turn left at light and go toward elevated railroad (Westchester Ave.—about 3 
blocks) 

. Right before you get to elevated railroad there is a green highway sign that 
says “Westchester Avenue Turns” and takes you to the right. Do that. Turn 
left at elevated railroad.
7. Stay under the elevated railroad thru the stop lights. Immediately past the 
elevated railroad station, on the far right is Library, next to Apple Bank. You 
may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
8. Ring bell on door

From Upstate: - On Hutchinson River Parkway 
1. Take Hutchinson River Parkway South to “Westchester Avenue East Tremont 
Avenue Exit” 
2. Make left at traffic light. 
3. Go to elevated railroad (Westchester Ave.); turn right. 
4. Go about three blocks following the elevated railroad past intersection with 
East Tremont Avenue. 
5. Immediately after entrance to elevated railroad station on the right, look for 
the Library on extreme right (next to Apple Bank).
6. You may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
7. Ring bell on door .

On New England Thruway
1. Get off thruway at Westchester Avenue Exit.
2. Follow Westchester Avenue (elevated railroad) to 1 block past East Tremont 
Avenue.
3. Immediately after entrance to elevated railroad station on the right, look for 
the Library on extreme right (next to Apple Bank).
4. You may turn right on Overing Street and park your car.
5. Ring bell on door 
 

  

About the Library

 

     The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room is a privately-endowed library open to the public. It has two separate non-circulating book collections: a general Reading Room collection and a research collection specialization on Bronx history.
 
The library is an exempt operating foundation, governed by a board of trustees.

 

 

History

The library was officially founded in 1892 by Collis P. Huntington, a Southern Pacific Railroad magnate whose summer home was in nearby Throgs Neck. Its origins, however, were in the will of Peter C. Van Schaick, a local philanthropist, who set aside funds from his estate to build a free reading room to be donated to the citizens of the village of Westchester upon its completion. The library, constructed between 1882 and 1883, was ultimately refused by the local townspeople who did not want to pay for its upkeep. The building sat vacant until Huntington was somehow informed of the stalemate and decided to take over the project. He put on an addition, and the library’s doors opened to the public October 17,in 1891. It was the only library for the public in the Bronx and the only Library at Westchester Square, until the New York Public Library opened a branch across the street in 1937.

The library took on an important new role in 1930, when Archer M. Huntington, Collis’s adopted son and benefactor of the Museum of the American Indian, Heye Foundation, built an addition to the Huntington Free Library to house the museum’s book collection which was transferred to the library.

Buildings

                                                                                                                   
The 1882-83 red brick reading room was designed by Frederick C. Withers, an architect known for his use of High Victorian Gothic and Gothic Revival styles. The Jefferson Market Courthouse in Greenwich Village and Gallaudet College in Washington, DC, are other examples of his work. When Collis Huntington took over the library in 1890, a local architect, William Henderson and Son's, added the rear part of the reading room and the two-story residence above it. The 1882-83 building, with its 1890 addition, was designated a New York City landmark in 1994.

When the library acquired its American Indian collection in 1930, Archer Huntington financed a new building, designed by Charles E. Birge, to hold the collection’s book stacks and staff offices. This three-story, 40’ x 82’ building is attached to the original building. It does not have public areas.

Inside the Reading Room. Visitors entering the Reading Room are greeted by a large raised engraving (1911) by B.L. Pratt of Collis Potter Huntington, dedicating the building to his memory. An oil painting of Huntington presented to the library by the citizens of West Chester in 1893 is over the fireplace. Covering the fireplace is a large-scale map, Throgg’s Neck in the 1850s, drawn by Bronx historian John McNamara. The original Visitors Register has its own stand and is in use today. The first signatures date to 1891. Booker T. Washington registered as a visitor in 1892 and 1894. The furniture in the library is in keeping with its turn-of-the-century character. Much of it is original. The piping for the reading room’s original gas lighting is most obvious in the small book stack room in the rear. A wood sculpture of the library, carved by Patrolman John H. Jones in 1901, sits on top of a bookshelf. The large map case and the library’s card catalog are still in use. Other items of interest include vintage typewriters, one a very early electric model, and a 1917 Tiffany grandfather’s clock.





Contact the Library

Huntington Free Library and Reading Room
9 Westchester Square
Bronx, NY 10461-3583

(718) 829-7770

Support the Library

The library encourages contributions for its programs and for general support. It is currently soliciting funding to restore the windows, hanging pendant, and front doors in its 1882 New York City Landmark building. Please make checks payable to the Huntington Free Library and Reading Room. All donations are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law. Your support will be greatly appreciated.

Collections

The Huntington Free Library and Reading Room has two separate non-circulating book collections: a general Reading Room collection and  a specialization in Bronx history.

Reading Room

Established in 1892, the Huntington Free Library is one of the oldest libraries for the public in the Bronx. Until 1937 when the New York Public Library established a branch nearby, it was the only library in the Westchester Square area, and maintained a collection suitable to a general reading room. Since that time, acquisitions have also complemented the needs of the Huntington Free Library's Indian collection.

General Collection

The Reading Room collection, comprising approximately 7100 volumes, is housed in open stacks in the Reading Room. The collection is catalogued in the Dewey decimal system and is accessible through a card catalog. The library staff has judiciously added to and weeded the collection over the years. Nonetheless, its character is one of the turn-of-the-century, with many of its imprints dating to the period between 1860 and 1930. Fiction, biographies, bibliographies, American history books, books on philosophy and art, American Indian juvenile books, and volumes on the natural sciences and library science comprise many of the subject areas covered. The Reading Room's general reference collection also includes modern dictionaries, encyclopedias, atlases, directories, almanacs, etc. 

In recent years library staff members have concentrated on acquiring general reference, American Indian juvenile literature, Western American art, and New York State history titles with the limited funds available, feeling these materials are appropriate in the environment of a non-circulating collection.
 

  Bronx History

The Reading Room's collection of materials relating to New York State history, with an emphasis on that of the Bronx, is the most heavily consulted segment of its holdings. Titles range from privately printed accounts such as Bronx Cheer: A Memoir, by Julius Jacobs (1976), The History of the Morris Park Racecourse and the Morris Family, by Nicholas Di Brino (1977), and Westchester's Forgotten Railway, by Roger Arcara (1972), to standard works like The Bronx and Its People: A History (1927), The Story of the Bronx, by Stephen Jenkins (1912), and The Borough of the Bronx, 1639-1913, by Harry Cook (1913). The breadth of New York history is reflected in the collection, beginning with works on its archaeology such as Alanson Skinner's Exploration of Aboriginal Sites at Throgs Neck and Clasons Point, New York City (1919), and William Ritchie's The Pre-Iroquoian Occupations of New York State. Historical figures are not forgotten. Three titles, for example, deal with the controversy surrounding an infamous Bronx resident, Anne Hutchinson, while several others discuss the Pell family. A collection of newspaper articles, authored primarily by John McNamara, spans a forty-year period and reflects the on-going record of Bronx history. Arranged chronologically, the collection is indexed geographically, providing easy access to articles discussing a particular Bronx neighborhood.

This special Reading Room collection is not limited to the Bronx. Several of its titles are guidebooks, gazetteers, and manuals covering all of New York City and/or including the State of New York as a whole. D.T. Valentine's Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York for 1856, for example, is complemented by subsequent editions patterned after that classic work. J. H. French's Gazetteer of the State of New York (1860) expands coverage such as Valentine's to include the entire state. New York's history is also accessible through heavily used works such as the Historical Atlas of New York State. The collection also holds a modern atlas of New York. New York City guidebooks abound in this collection. Readers can get a real sense of what the city was like in 1892 by consulting Moses King's King's Handbook of New York City. On a more practical level, recently published guidebooks such as New York Open to the Public lead readers to today's information. Both are complimented by works such as the Federal Writers' Project publications.

Bronx Photographs

The library has a growing collection of historic photographs of the Bronx, particularly of the Westchester Square area. Ships and coal barges in Westchester Creek, the 1922 World War I Honor Roll in the Square, and transportation ranging from horse-drawn hearses to the construction of the elevated railroad are featured in this collection, as is the birthplace of Ezra Cornell, the founder of Cornell University. The Westchester Square area was the scene of a great deal of activity during the Revolutionary War. Sites associated with many well-known Bronx names from the colonial era, such as Pell, Ferris, and Ponton, appear in the library’s photograph collection. The library has put much of this collection on slides. It regularly hosts programs featuring its photographs.



Subject File Collection

Over the years the library has accumulated a large body of ephemeral material, currently housed in vertical files and organized by subject. Journal articles, pamphlets, government documents, newspaper clippings, auction catalogs, and early correspondence are among the types of items in this collection that is not catalogued. It contains a wealth of information and is heavily used by researchers. 


The Encyclopedia of New York City, edited by Kenneth T. Jackson. New Haven: Yale University Press, New York: The New-York Historical Society, 1975.
Contains an article on the history of the Indians of New York City, “American Indians,” by Robert S. Grumet.


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